Slide chords

There is no formal category that can be called slide chords, yet this overview highlights aspects when using a slide from a chordal perspective. A slide is positioned directly above the fret and not just before as fingers when playing a chord. The diagrams are therefore using a half transparent line representing the slide. Of natural reasons the most straightforward way of accomplished chord with a slide is by include tones on the same fret vertically. Additional methods are possible, such as muting a strings in front of the slide (if the slide isn't put on the little finger).

Some brief advice if you are unexperienced with slide guitar: 1) Don’t press down the strings with the slide; 2) the slide should be positioned just over the fret; 3) for a vibrato, wiggle the slide back and forth.

Open D tuning

G

  • G chord diagram with slide

A

  • A chord diagram with slide

G/B

  • G/B chord diagram with slide

A/C#

  • A/C# chord diagram with slide

G5/D

  • A5 chord diagram with slide

A5/E

  • A5 chord diagram with slide

Comment

Since the positions are movable, only a few chords (the important IV and V) are included.

Learn more about Open D tuning.

Open G tuning

C/G

  • C/G chord diagram with slide

D/A

  • D/A chord diagram with slide

C

  • C chord diagram with slide

D

  • D chord diagram with slide

Em(no5)

  • Em chord diagram with slide

F#m(no5)

  • F#m chord diagram with slide

Comment

As in Open D tuning, minor chords are seldom a viable choice with unnatural methods, but playing the two highest strings will result in minor chords with omitted fifths.

Learn more about Open G tuning.

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